Monday, August 28, 2017

Bankruptcy and Credit Scores


Filing for bankruptcy is always a big decision, with many factors to weigh.  One of those is the effect that a bankruptcy can have on your future credit possibilities. In the short term, bankruptcy will significantly lower your credit score - and this can create extra costs for you when you work to rebuild your credit, or try to purchase a car or a home.  However, if your credit score has already taken a big hit such as a foreclosure filing, the impact of a bankruptcy filing may not be as significant.
Even with this credit impact, bankruptcy may still be the right decision for you. It is possible to rebuild your credit score over time, after bankruptcy. But if you choose to file bankruptcy, you need to consider the short-term credit hit along with all the other factors. Understanding Your Credit Score Credit scores, also called FICO scores, are issued by the three major credit bureaus - TransUnion, Equifax and Experian. These scores - named after the software used to calculate credit information - range from 300 to 8501 points and are used by financial institutions to determine how risky it would be to extend a line of credit to consumers.  According to Equifax, the majority of credit scores fall within the 600s to 700s. FICO scores are used in about 90% of decisions to extend credit. 
In order to calculate this snapshot of your credit history, credit bureaus use six months’ worth of data about your spending habits. The factors that are considered when calculating a credit score include your payment history and whether you have consistently paid your bills on time; your outstanding debt; the percentage of available credit that you have on each of your credit cards; the types of credit that you use; length of credit history, new credit, and whether you are currently employed. The credit bureaus also consider how many inquiries have been made about your credit, which can indicate that you have applied for several lines of credit because you are struggling financially.
Other important factors that can negatively affect your credit score include filing for bankruptcy, home foreclosure and liens issued against you. The Importance of Your Credit Score The higher your credit score is, the more confident that lenders will be that you can pay back a loan or other lines of credit. Typically, lenders look favorably upon consumers that have a credit score that is 700 or higher.
If your credit score is 600, or lower, however, lenders will be more cautious about extending credit to you. And even if your bad credit score does not preclude you from
1 According to Experian.com
receiving credit, you can expect to pay higher interest rates on your credit cards or larger down payments when you purchase a home or car. A low credit score can also affect other areas of your life that may surprise you. For example, in some cases employers look at the credit history of job candidates during their hiring processes, particularly for jobs that involved handling money. Conclusion There are also ways to improve your credit score.  Talk with an attorney at our firm to discuss your options. We can answer any questions you may have about the impact of bankruptcy on credit score.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

DOES THE COURT  SYSTEM CONSIDER A CHILD'S PREFERENCES IN DETERMINING CUSTODY ARRANGEMENTS?



People often ask if it's possible for their child to pick who he/she wants to live with and/or at what age their child can pick which parent to live with? It seems natural to many that a child (especially an older child) should be able to express their preference and that their preference should be followed.  However, in Florida, that is rarely the case.


To begin, Florida Courts are reluctant to let minor children testify in Family Law disputes.  Unless the Court finds that the child’s testimony is necessary, it is unlikely the child will be allowed to testify.  If the Court does feel the child’s testimony is necessary, it must be verified that the child is competent and capable of observing, recollecting, narrating facts, and has a moral sense of the duty to tell the truth.  While it is true that an older child would be more likely to be permitted to testify than a younger child, age is not the determining factor. A younger child, who is more mature may be permitted to testify while an older, less mature counterpart is not.

Next, all time-sharing orders (What days/times each parent is responsible for the children) in Florida are determined based on what the Court finds is in the best interest of the minor child(ren).  The Florida statutes provide a long list of criteria that judges use when determining what time-sharing arrangement is in a child’s best interest.  While the preference of the child is one of the criteria that judges are to take into consideration, that factor alone is not enough to determine what is in the child’s best interest.  For example, if a child is permitted to testify and unequivocally states that he or she wants to live with Parent A, but the Court finds that Parent B provides a more stable environment and has more time to spend with the child, the Court will almost certainly favor more time with Parent B.  A primary reason for this is that children are often unaware of what is in their best interest.  They may choose one parent over the other based on which parent allows them to stay up later or go out longer, rather than which parent is providing the more nurturing and stable environment. 

So when will a child's preferences be strongly considered?  The Courts are more likely to consider a child's preferences when one parent can prove that the child is experiencing some sort of emotional trauma or instability while with the other parent. Likewise, if the child’s preference is based on accusations of abuse or neglect by one of the parents, the court would certainly take that into account.  
In conclusion, there is no set age when a child can determine which parent they will live with, at least not until they turn eighteen.  Courts are unlikely to let a minor child testify, except in rare cases and even then, their preference will likely be given little weight unless supported by other factors.  If you are going through a dissolution of marriage or paternity case and your child is expressing a desire to live more often with you or the other parent, it is a good idea to ask your attorney about the possibility of having a Guardian Ad Litem appointed.  The Guardian Ad Litem may be able to meet with the children and the parent’s and make a 3rd party recommendation to the Court based on what they determine to be in the child’s best interest. For more information, please contact the Law Office of Pamela J Helton at (352) 243-9991 or check out our website at www.AttorneyHelton.com.



Written by: Attorney Barry Newton

Friday, June 23, 2017

Bankruptcy and Credit Scores


How Long Does Bankruptcy Affect My Credit Score?

Posted By The Law Office of Pamela J. Helton, P.A.



According to Debt.org, Americans owe a total of $11.4 trillion in debt for credit cards, mortgages, student loans, and other expenses.  The housing market crash caused many Florida homeowners to lose half the market value of their homes and Florida is considered one of the hardest hit markets in the recession.  With that in mind, it should come as no surprise that many Americans chose to file bankruptcy to help relieve their debt burden during the recession. 



Although bankruptcy is an effective way to get relief from overwhelming debt, it is not without consequences. Specifically, bankruptcy will impact your ability to open new credit lines for some time after the process is complete. There are ways to improve your credit in the meantime, but it can take as long as a decade before the bankruptcy is off your record.



Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13

The two main types of bankruptcy for consumers are Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. Chapter 7 is what comes to mind when most people think of bankruptcy, as it completely clears many, if not all, of your unsecured debts.  Chapter 13, on the other hand, is more of a reorganization of debt. You will still owe the money (or at least a chunk of it), but it is organized into an affordable payment plan to help you regain control over the situation. Bankruptcy reporting can stay on your record for as long as 10 years.  



Can I Improve My Credit Score Before Bankruptcy Disappears?

It’s certainly not impossible to obtain a home loan, auto loan, or open a credit card after bankruptcy, but it can be more difficult. If your credit was particularly bad before the bankruptcy, you will likely have trouble qualifying for any large or premium credit lines.  However, there are many steps you can take to begin rebuilding your score. Perhaps the most important thing to do after bankruptcy is paying your bills on time.



Considering Bankruptcy? Call Our Firm Today.

For those who are feeling overwhelmed by tax debt, the benefits of bankruptcy can far outweigh the consequences. If this sounds like you, call The Law Offices of Pamela J. Helton, P.A. today.


Friday, September 9, 2016

Is my salary or hourly rate of pay about to change?


SIGNIFICANT UPDATES TO OVERTIME PAY AND EXEMPTIONS

UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT

Written by: Attorney Dylan Hall 

The main purpose behind the Fair Labor Standards Act is to ensure that certain employees receive sufficient compensation for the work they perform. One mechanism used to achieve this is guaranteed time-and-a-half overtime pay for certain non-salaried employees. However, major changes to the rules and requirements for overtime pay are set take place December 1 of this year, and it is essential that everyone affected understand how they will be impacted.

Currently, all non-exempt employees earning less than $23,660 each year are entitled to time-and-a-half pay for all hours worked in excess of 40 hours per week. However, by the end of this year the requirement for time-and-a-half overtime pay shall apply to all non-exempt employees earning less than $47,476.00 each year. This is a huge change from the current law and is anticipated to provide overtime pay protections to an additional 4.2 million employees, of which at least 330,000 reside in Florida.

Employers will have to choose from several options in order to comply with this updated threshold for each affected non-exempt employee. Some of these options include (1) raising the annual salary to at least $47,476.00; (2) pay an hourly wage with time-and-a-half pay for each hour worked in excess of 40 hours per week; and (3) keep the current sub-$47,476.00 per year salary and also pay overtime for each hour worked in excess of 40 hours per week. Of course, employers are likely to incur additional payroll expenses as a result of these options, and so an expected fourth option taken by employers is to reduce the number of hours permitted to be worked each week primarily by hiring additional part-time workers for the same position.

Another significant change to the Fair Labor Standards Act that will take place on December 1 of this year concerns certain job types that have historically been exempt from the time-and-a-half pay requirement for work in excess of 40 hours per week. The major category of previously-exempt job types that will now also be protected by the overtime pay requirements are white collar positions that include executive, administrative, professional, and computer-professional jobs. The classifications and underlying qualifications for which employees constitute such non-exempt white collar positions are complex and apply on a case-by-case basis, but it is understood that the inclusion of this class of employee will be a significant contributor toward the anticipated expansion of overtime protection for 4.2 million more employees.

           There are a few other aspects of the new law that affected employers and employees must be aware of. For one, any overtime pay earned for hours worked in excess of 40 per week must be calculated on week-by-week basis. In other words, overtime pay cannot be based on the average number of hours worked in a month or year, but must be strictly paid out pursuant to each week’s actual hours worked. Second, meeting and training time generally constitutes work that employees must be compensated for, as is work-related travel other than the ordinary commute to and from work. Lastly, the salary threshold for when overtime pay is required that is currently set at $47,476.00 beginning in December 1 of this year will be consistently updated every three years going forward based on calculations involving the standard salary level at the time of each revision.  

This broad overview of the major changes being implemented under the Fair Labor Standards Act makes clear the importance for affected employers and employees to understand how this will impact their business and compensation so that compliance can be assured when the new law goes into effect on December 1 of this year. Should you have any questions regarding the Fair Labor Standards Act or any other legal questions whatsoever, please don’t hesitate to call the Law Office of Pamela J. Helton, P.A. at 352-243-9991 to schedule a consultation with one of our attorneys.



Citations:

-       The Florida Bar News, Volume 43, Number 15

-       www.dol.gov

Friday, June 24, 2016

Can I keep my driver's license if I fall behind in child support payments?


In Florida, child support is ordered in nearly every paternity or dissolution of marriage action involving minor children.  The State of Florida takes this obligation very seriously and provides a wide variety of means by which to enforce a person’s child support obligation. The most common form of enforcement is to suspend the non-paying party’s driver’s license.  Florida law allows for a notice to be sent to the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles informing them of the intent to suspend a non-paying party’s driver’s license just fifteen days after the party has become delinquent in their payments.  The party will then typically have just twenty days to either pay the amount in full or enter into a written repayment agreement.

However, often times a party may get behind due to no fault of their own.  The law does recognize that it would be improper to suspend a person’s driver’s license when they desire to, but are simply unable to, comply with their child support obligation.  For that reason, the law does provide certain instances where a person’s driver’s license will not be suspended even though they have become delinquent in their obligation.  These exceptions include:  when the delinquent party demonstrates that he or she receives reemployment assistance or unemployment compensation; demonstrates that he or she is disabled and incapable of self-support or that he or she receives benefits under the federal Supplemental Security Income program or Social Security Disability Insurance program; demonstrates that he or she receives temporary cash assistance; or demonstrates that he or she is making payments in accordance with a confirmed bankruptcy plan. 

If a person falls into one of the above exceptions, it is important that they immediately notify the proper personnel upon receiving a notice of intent to suspend their driver’s license.  Otherwise, the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles will proceed to suspend the person’s driver’s license. 



Written by: Attorney Barry Newton

Friday, April 1, 2016

BIG CHANGES!


HAVE YOU HEARD ABOUT THE PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE LAWS ON ALIMONY AND TIMESHARING WITH MINOR CHILDREN?
Written by: Attorney Dylan Hall

In a divorce proceeding, two of the most commonly fought-over issues are alimony payments and each parent’s timesharing with their children. While it is no surprise that such important issues are often highly contested, a major reason for the difficulty in resolving them is that many attorneys view the current Florida laws regarding alimony and timesharing as outdated and difficult to work with.

Alimony may be ordered by a Judge and requires the higher-earning spouse to contribute toward the difference in the couples’ incomes by giving the lower-earning spouse monthly payments after they are divorced. The duration of these alimony payments is usually determined by how long the couple was married. Current Florida law generally provides that when alimony is appropriate, the payments shouldn’t last longer than the total length of the marriage itself. However, if a couple is married for longer than 17 years, the higher-earning spouse may be ordered to make monthly alimony payments to the lower-earning spouse forever. On top of that, a Judge has the authority to order permanent alimony even for marriages that last significantly less than 17 years. The only way the permanent alimony payments can ever be stopped, is if the lower-earning spouse remarries or enters into a relationship with someone where they are financially supported the same as if they were married.

Many feel that permanent alimony, as currently allowed under Florida law, is too generalized and doesn’t take into account important factors particular to each marriage. Because of this, the Florida Senate just passed a bill (SB 668) that would do away with the current Florida law on alimony. Instead, this bill would require a Judge to use a standard formula based on length of marriage and the higher earning spouses’ incomes to determine an amount and duration of alimony payments. This scheme would largely end permanent alimony in the state of Florida and provide a much-needed predictable and reliable method for anticipating and determining likely alimony awards. If signed into law, this bill will take effect on October 1, 2016.

In addition, this proposed bill would also make a substantial change to Florida law regarding timesharing with minor children. As the law currently stands, there are no standard timesharing arrangements when a couple initially files for divorce or files a case to determine the paternity of a minor child. This can cause significant conflict regarding which parent gets to have and care for the child, both temporarily and permanently, which is of course very difficult on the parents and, most importantly, the children. To address this shortcoming, the proposed bill would make it standard practice for both parents to have equal timesharing in the best interest of the children, and therefore the parents will automatically be required to split their time with the children 50/50 unless and until an actual timesharing schedule can be agreed upon or established by a Judge. Furthermore, if one parent feels that the other parent should not have equal timesharing, that parent will need to convince the Judge as to why they should receive the majority of timesharing at the other parent’s expense.

As you can see, this proposed bill will create significant changes to the law regarding two major areas of contention in divorce and paternity cases, alimony and timesharing. Because of this, it is more important than ever to be represented by legal counsel that stays up to date on the newest laws and fully understands the repercussions of these changes. Should you have any questions regarding this proposed bill or any other legal questions whatsoever, please don’t hesitate to call our office and schedule a consultation with one of our attorneys.

Citations:



https://www.myfloridalaw.com/alimony/florida-alimony-reform/

Monday, October 5, 2015

Avoid Probate and protect your family with a Will


The passing of a family member is one of the most difficult times in anyone’s life. The grieving process can become considerably more trying when the distribution of the deceased’s assets is unclear or in dispute. This is why it is essential that you have an estate plan in place that provides a clear procedure for the distribution of your assets. It is also important to have a general understanding of the probate process that may be necessary to distribute your estate and the methods for avoiding unnecessary costs.

Whether or not you have a Will, there are a few ways to ensure that certain assets will be automatically distributed. For one, any real or personal property that is jointly held by yourself and another person with a right of survivorship or by the entireties goes straight to that surviving person. Examples include a homestead owned by a married couple, a joint checking account, and a vehicle titled as “John Doe or Jane Doe”. Next, any asset that has a designated beneficiary upon the holder’s passing - which includes life insurance proceeds and payable-on-death accounts - automatically go to that named beneficiary. Similarly, any asset placed in a living trust usually goes straight to the designated beneficiary upon your passing. The proper titling of assets can go a long way toward avoiding the emotional toll and considerable effort required to distribute assets that would otherwise be in dispute.

Having a well-drafted Will may be sufficient to avoid the probate process, however it is a common misconception that having a Will automatically eliminates the need for probate. For that reason, it is always recommended that when creating your Will you use an attorney whom you trust and that you provide full disclosure of your assets and desires, as this will allow your attorney to draft your Will with the maximum protections in place. Also, it should be noted that in Florida it is required that your Will be filed with the Clerk of Court within ten days of your passing in all situations.

The general idea behind probate is that your Personal Representative identifies the assets in your estate, uses these assets to pay off any creditor claims or taxes that are owed by the estate, and then distributes the remaining assets according to the terms of your Will or the Florida Statutes should you not have a Will. The probate process can be very complicated and is highly specific to each particular estate and the family members involved.

Probate can be an extremely emotional and trying time for your family members who are in the process of grieving their recent loss. One of the greatest gifts you can give your family is to minimize the financial impact of your passing by jointly titling your assets and designating beneficiaries wherever possible, and working closely and openly with a trusted attorney in drafting your Will.

Written by: Attorney Dylan Hall

Friday, July 3, 2015

Thinking of renting your home? Make sure you know what to expect.

Renting your home can be a great investment, but there are some things that you need to know before you commence such an undertaking. Prior to renting, be aware of the following:

1.     Are you renting a mobile home, a condo or a house?

Why is this important?  The Florida Statutes have specific requirements for each type of housing. Familiarize yourself and understand what obligations you are mandated to do under Florida Law.  The statute defines important information as to what a Landlord is required to provide a tenant, information regarding the security deposit, inspections of property and the eviction process, if necessary.
·       Attached Mobile Homes - Florida Statute 723
·       Recreational Vehicle Parks (non-attached mobile homes) - Florida Statute 513
·       Apartments, townhouses or houses - Florida Statute 83

2.     Are you planning to write a lease and how long do you want a lease to run?

 It is always recommended that all lease agreements should be in writing.  All parties benefit from a written lease             agreement, which sets out lease terms regarding pets, landscaping, fees, utilities, early termination, etc. When drafting a lease, it is important to get your lawyer involved.  Its best to have your lawyer review the lease agreement in the beginning so they can make sure that your home and rights are protected and safeguarded from potential litigation.  You also want to make sure the terms are legal and current under Florida law. Invest in the beginning, so you can avoid high legal fees in the end.

3.     Thinking of hiring a property manager?

Property managers are a great asset when renting out property. They are the main contact with the tenant(s) and handle most of the tenant issues and questions. However, you need to read the contract carefully when entering an agreement with a property manager.  Make sure you read and understand the terms of the agreement. What are the property manager’s duties? When can they act on your behalf? When do they need your consent? What are their fees? How do I terminate the relationship if needed? What are their duties and expectations if there is ever an eviction? Etc., Etc.  REMEMBER, a property manager is your agent when handling the rental property, meaning that anything they do or don’t do will always remain your responsibility/liability.  For example, some bad eggs have been known to rent the property, “hold the security deposit” and vanish without a trace.  Even if this happens, the Landlord is still obligated to comply with Florida law in regard to the security deposit. Simply stating that you don’t have the money to give back the Tenant’s security deposit is not going to be much of a defense in court.Make sure to get recommendations. 

4.     What are your expectations with a rental property?
       
Renting property is typically left to investors, so you need to be realistic.  When renting your home, you will have to realize it is no longer “your home” and is now a rental business.  Research the terms “normal wear and tear” because your definition is likely very different than the court’s definition and case law.  Do not expect renters to maintain the home in immaculate condition. If you’re lucky, you’ll get a great renter, however there are more bad than good.  Create a financial cushion for repairs and cleaning in-between each rental agreement.  When a renter is behaving badly, make sure you provide them with written notice and give them an opportunity to cure.  If they fail to do so, this will only help you should you ever need to go to court.

This article is not intended to discourage rental properties. The decision to rent can be a good one, but far too often individuals are overly excited to become landlords or desperate to rent out their properties due to a variety of financial circumstances. Please do not let excitement or desperation cause you to make mistakes that lead to more problems. Be smart, do your research and consult with an attorney that is familiar with Landlord Tenant Laws. If you would like to consult with an attorney from the Law Office of Pamela J. Helton, please call the office today at (352) 243-9991.    


Written by: Attorney Jennifer Sinker

Monday, April 20, 2015

Prenuptial Agreements: Read before you sign, ignorance is NOT always bliss

In fairy tales, there are typically two main characters who fall into a whirlwind romantic affair that quickly leads to “happily ever after” walking down the aisle.  It’s magical, wonderful and happy like any wedding should be, but wait, no one mentions the uncomfortable conversation Cinderella had when Prince Charming presented her with a prenuptial agreement.  The dreaded prenuptial agreement can send shivers down your spine.  The first reactions include anger, anxiety and disappointment.  How can anyone marry if they don’t think it will last forever?  But I’m here to tell you that a prenuptial agreement isn’t scary and isn’t the awful scenario you may believe it to be. If written and negotiated correctly, the agreement protects both parties. 

Take this into consideration: According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the median age of those entering into their first marriage was 28.5 for men and 26.7 for women. Typically, by this age a career path is established, children may exist from previous relationship(s), and assets are accumulated such as property, investments and/or retirement. These assets need to be protected. In previous generations, it was common for couples to marry young before they had established any assets and then build assets together. What people tend to forget is that if you never get divorced, you’ll never use the prenuptial agreement, but if on the unfortunate chance divorce cannot be avoided why not ensure some type of protection, a sort of insurance policy on the marriage.  Prenuptial agreements can assist in making sure the material items you’ve accrued prior to the marriage are safeguarded for your children, parents or siblings should the marriage not work out. In the event of a failed marriage, would you like your retirement to be safeguarded for your children or your ex?

Further clarification can be provided with an understanding of prenuptial agreement (a.k.a. premarital agreement) and how they work. According to the Uniform Premarital Agreement Act, Civ. Pro. 61.079 Premarital agreements, a premarital agreement is a written agreement between two parties, signed by both and enforceable without consideration other than the marriage itself.  One can contract obligations of: property, disposition of property upon separation, death or on any other event, establish, waive or eliminate spousal support (except pendent lite, which is a Latin term meaning “pending litigation” if this is required the Judge will order it), disposition of the death benefit of a life insurance policy, governing law and any other matter that does not violate public policy (i.e. Child support can NEVER be waived).  The agreement becomes effective as soon as you get married.  After the marriage, the agreement can be changed, revoked or abandoned.  It also does not safeguard any assets that you accrue together or during the marriage, only what was yours before the marriage.

Unfortunately, having a prenuptial or premarital agreement does not mean that one can avoid the courtroom.  Donald Trump detailed in his book, Trump: How to Get Rich, how his ex-wife Ivana challenged their prenuptial agreement. Trump stated: “[w]e needed a bus to get Ivana’s lawyers to court. It was a disaster, but I had a solid prenup, and it held up.”¹ Prenuptial agreements can be contested (challenged in court) if a party can establish that the agreement wasn’t entered into voluntary, the agreement was entered into by fraud, duress or coercion, unconscionable, or the party did not have fair and reasonable disclosure of the financial obligation of the other party.  This is key! Our firm always requires a full financial disclosure to be provided by both parties when entering a prenuptial agreement.  You cannot contest a prenup by simply saying I didn’t understand or felt it was unfair. If you sign it, it’s official. According to the courts, a prenuptial agreement shall be construed and interpreted as any other contract. ² Although a trial court may be motivated to do what it considers to be fair and equitable, it retains no jurisdiction to rewrite the terms of the agreement. ³ According to Barakat v. Broward County House. Auth., 771 So. 2d 1193 (Fla. 4th DCA 2000), “[i]t is never the role of a trial court to rewrite a contract to make it more reasonable for one of the parties or to relieve a party from what turns out to be a bad bargain.”  If presented with a prenuptial agreement or if you’re considering having one drafted, take the time to read it, understand it, ask questions and seek out a lawyer to help make sure you’ve safeguarded your family and your future. 

 ¹ Donald J. Trump, Trump: How to Get Rich (2004).

² Ledea-Genaro v. Genaro, 963 So.2d 749, 752 (Fla. 4th DCA 2007)

³ Rocha v. Mendonca, 35 So. 3d 973 (Fla. 3d DCA 2010)


Written by: Attorney Jennifer Sinker

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

WHAT I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT MODIFICATIONS?


A settlement agreement delegates all the final details for the children such as custody arrangements (what days they are with mom/dad), financial responsibilities (who pays medical bills, health insurance, schools lunches/supplies, etc.), sets limitations for locations (child can’t be taken overseas, out of state, or to live outside of county, etc.), and a whole lot of other parenting details. In a Paternity action or Dissolution of Marriage with minor children, the parties frequently view their settlement agreement as the END of disputes and believe they are now finished dealing with their ex forever. Disappointment rushes in when parents later discover it’s not uncommon for problems to come up years later that require going back to court to seek a modification for the original parenting agreement.

The Florida Statutes and case law have established a set of criteria including a two factor test to help determine if it’s necessary to go back to court and/or retain an attorney for a modification: (1) a substantial, material, and unanticipated change of circumstances, and (2) that the modification is in the best interests of the minor children involved. Previously, strong evidence had to be shown to justify a modification, but it’s going to get even harder to obtain a modification. The Florida Bar Family Law Section held its annual conference in January of this year, and one of the topics discussed was the increasing congestion of the Judge’s dockets (schedule) partly due to an overwhelming number of pending modification actions. In an attempt to fix this docket congestion, I have seen a general policy shift where modifications granted upon the most extraordinary showings of a substantial, material, and unanticipated change of circumstances affecting the best interests of the minor children involved. In short, it is becoming more difficult to modify a settlement agreement.

What does this mean for you? If you separate from someone that you share a child or children with, it is now more important than ever to fight for an agreement that is as favorable and as forward-thinking as possible. In the past, it was often suggested to compromise on certain things that you could live with for now understanding that if it caused problems in the future, you could go back and make changes at a later time. A practical example would be: Katie and Bill (my fake couple for the purpose of this article) have a nine month old and they decide that it’s in the best interest of the child for both mom and dad to remain close by (live in the same county), so that baby learns and bonds equally with both parents at an early age. That means neither mom nor dad can relocate the child out of the area and they make it a part of the agreement. Ten years pass, baby is now older and Katie gets a dream job offer in Georgia. Since it was a part of the original agreement, Katie would have to choose between child and job, but making changes to agreement is no longer an option. From now on, it is absolutely essential that a settlement agreement to a Paternity action or Dissolution of Marriage with minor children, only agrees to terms that they can permanently live with. Think it through and seek the advice of an attorney before you sign a settlement agreement. For more information, call (352) 243-9991 and schedule a consultation today!  

Written by: Attorney Dylan Hall